Friday, December 9, 2011

Crisco Christmas Cookies: Vintage Ad & Recipes

I've mentioned before the virtues and history of Crisco with a recipe for Retro Crisco Chocolate Chip Cookies. This unique product had a real impact on baking. Here's a link to a 1919 recipe and advertisement for Chocolate Gingerbread. Being that it's the holiday season, I'm posting this fun Vintage Ad with recipes from December 1952 for several different holiday treats that use Crisco. Get Baking!


9 comments:

Barbara | Creative Culinary said...

How fun...I remember as a girl we using Crisco a lot; butter was way too pricey. I love butter in my cookies now but one recipe requires half Crisco or the texture is all wrong. Thanks for the memories and taking me back to my childhood.

Janet Rudolph said...

We had Crisco on hand for dietary reasons. I do know how to make a great pie crust with Crisco, but I must admit, it's butter these days...

Sunchowder said...

I lurrve these vintage ads. My Mom always used Crisco to make her Toll House Cookes and always used Crisco in her Pie Crusts too :) I myself use much more butter these days, but I must admit that I just purchased some of the Crisco sticks to do a pie crust half butter half Crisco for a Meyer Lemon Pie I am making. Thanks for the memories Janet! :)

yummychunklet said...

I so remember seeing Crisco as a kid and not understanding what it was. Ah, memories...

Kelly @ Foodie Fiasco said...

It's so fun to see old ads, isn't it? I'm not a Crisco kind of gal, but I am still intrigued. ;)

Janet Rudolph said...

Kelly, still love to have a donut guest post from you :-)

Jackie at mulledwinerecipe said...

"Use Crisco - it's digestible". Was there concern at the time that Crisco was indigestible?

Janet Rudolph said...

Yes, as with many fats, it was a concern.. the advertisers--and the product-- wanted to make sure people wouldn't be concerned.

AdsFromThe1800s said...

I remember Crisco! Besides baking, my mom used to grease pans with it. She would wrap her hand in a napkin, dip it in the "tub," and smear a big handful around. I think today I would rather use a good quality lard, as gross as that has formerly sounded to me (for most of my lifetime). Great advertisement - love vintage ads!
www.adsfromthe1800s.com